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Dude Can I Bum A Plug?

The new electric car from Chevrolet, the Volt, is being highly touted. It is called a plug-in car. You simply plug it in to charge it up. It also runs on gas when the charge it low.

The thing lists for around $40K but Chevy states that "qualified  buyers" can get a federal tax credit of up to $7,500. I wonder who qualifies for this little federal tax credit or added incentive as they call it. And more to the point, who is paying for it. The answer seems clear to me.

The Volt will go 25 to 50 miles on battery before it switches over to gas. This represents a usage of about 36 kWh per 100 miles. There are varying calculations out there about how much it would cost to charge the battery, but using the ones I found on GM's site, at 10 cents a kWh, this car would cost about $2.64 per mile to operate. Fair enough.

What will happen to electric rates if demand goes up higher due to more of these types of cars on the road? The majority of electricity in the US is generated by burning oil, coal, or natural gas. Sounds like we would be defeating our goal of getting off these things to me. The $2,64 that GM quotes in their engineering statistics looks good right now, but what if gas goes back down or if electricity rates rise due to higher demand? Also, that price is only good for up to about 50 miles until the gas engine kicks in.

The batteries are supposed to last for 10 years. There is some criticism that the battery does not operate well in cold climates. I wonder where the used batteries will be disposed of.

Any input on the new car or technology?

 

 

Comment balloon 8 commentsKevin Robinson • March 13 2011 10:50AM

Comments

Cost of generating more energy NOTHING! The same libs who consider this "green", are the same ones who would block any expansion of any kind of new power plant expansion. If 10% of Americans drove electric vehicles, we wouldn't have the extra power to charge them..period. These (libs) are simple minded people who exist in an alternative reality.

Posted by Jon Budish (Resident Realty) over 8 years ago

Jon- Thanks for commenting. I am not sold on this technology.

Posted by Kevin Robinson, Fractional Developer over 8 years ago

Dale JR says the technology is not there yet...I believe him.  Less than 300 where sold in February which tell me that the US auto-buyer is not buying it either. 

Posted by Wallace S. Gibson, CPM, LandlordWhisperer (Gibson Management Group, Ltd.) over 8 years ago

My truck doesn't cost that much to operate per mile. Am i missing something here?

Posted by Mike Frazier, Northwest Tennessee Realtor (Carousel Realty of Dyer County) over 8 years ago

I would doubt if it is generating any heat whatsoever when it is cold and running only on electric.

This could be a very cold car to drive in winter. Perhaps if it is putting out electric heat, but then it will not go any 30 miles on electric!

Posted by Paul Walker, Scott AFB IL Area Realtor (Equity Fifty Five Realty, LLC) over 8 years ago

They recommend that hybrid batteries be replaced every 5 years (not cheap either!).  Maybe this one is better. 

When I first saw your title I thought maybe the blog was about Joe Biden!

Posted by Jay Markanich, Home Inspector - servicing all Northern Virginia (Jay Markanich Real Estate Inspections, LLC) over 8 years ago

From what I have read the technology is not there yet. If someone wants to buy one that is their choice, but I am not going to.

Posted by Kevin Robinson, Fractional Developer over 8 years ago

How can spending 40k on a car going to be saving anyone any money?  That is the burning question?  I can buy a new SUV for 25K and spend the rest "powering" it for years. These folks are idiots and they will only be good with the government forcing us to buy the crappy things.

Posted by Dale Terry over 8 years ago

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