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HERE IS THE OATH?

I think we all agree the comments should never have been made by McCrystal and his staff.  Since there is so much talk about the sworn oath McCrystal took, I wanted to know what the oath states.  Does he take an oath to defend the Constitution and obey his Commander and Chief under all circumstances. Because I wanted to know before making any future opinions I looked it up. 

Officers take a slightly different oath than enlisted men; the oath for officers does not include "obey orders".

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I, [name], do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. So help me God.[1]

Note that the last sentence is not required to be said if the speaker has a personal or moral objection, as is true of all oaths administered by the United States government. Article Six of the United States Constitution requires that there be no religious test for public office. In addition, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission are examples of government policies and agencies preventing discrimination on the basis of religion.

Note also that this is not an oath to defend any specific territory or persons or property. This is an oath to defend the Constitution of the United States.

Note also that there is no duration defined in the Oath.

The Oath  of Office is a solemn oath taken by officers of the United States Uniformed Services on commissioning. It differs slightly from that of the oath of enlistment that enlisted members recite when they enter the service. It is statutory (i.e. required by law) and is prescribed by Section 3331, Title 5, United States Code[1]. It is traditional for officers to recite the oath upon promotion but as long as the officer's service is continuous this is not actually required.[2] One notable difference between the officer and enlisted oaths is that the oath taken by officers does not include any provision to obey orders; while enlisted personnel are bound by the Uniform Code of Military Justice to obey lawful orders, officers in the service of the United States are bound by this oath to disobey any order that violates the Constitution of the United States.[3] 

This is the enlisted mens Oath

I, (NAME), do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God.

  

Comment balloon 1 commentKevin Robinson • June 24 2010 09:31AM

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I think that we all should take this oath and think about what is really being said.  I like that they still allow the use of the "So help me God."

Posted by Jody Lautenbach (Century 21 Premier Associates) almost 9 years ago

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